About the Pediatric Palliative Care 2020 Webinar Series

There continues to be significant data highlighting the workforce shortage in pediatric palliative care and as the number of children with chronic, complex and life-limiting illness continues to increase, the training needs of physicians and healthcare teams has increased as well. Many adult providers, family practitioners and smaller hospice teams have identified training as the leading barrier to their ability to provide end-of-life care to children. Larger systems with new or established pediatric palliative care (PPC) teams often struggle to find time for education or funding to support professional development.

A team from Pennsylvania’s Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition (PPCC), Greater Illinois Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition (GIPPCC) Jacob’s Heart Children’s Cancer Support Services, Stanford Medical School and the CSU Shiley Institute for Palliative Care have collaborated to offer the PPC Webinar Series to raise the visibility of pediatric palliative care and to build clinicians’ competencies and confidence in providing care to children.

Learn More About Our Archived Webinar Series

Upcoming Pediatric Palliative Care Webinars

Decoding Decision-Making with Families

Providers and parents want to make the “best” decisions for a child with a serious illness. Ideally in shared decision-making, providers and families each have space to give and receive information, articulate and consider the options before them, and to discuss their thoughts and feelings honestly and respectfully.
This process is not straight-forward and is filled with thinking and logic alongside emotion and hope.
How can we participate meaningfully? How can we deconstruct what families hear and think? How can we facilitate/share/enhance the best decision-making on behalf of the beloved, unique child sometimes in the face of parental indecision and prognostic uncertainty?

Learning Objectives:

1. Brief definition of shared decision-making.
2. Acknowledge differing provider’s roles with families.
3. Present challenging palliative care decisions that families face.
4. Use case example to illustrate “best practice.”

Presenter:

Janet Duncan is a Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner who helped found the Pediatric Advanced Care Team, a pediatric palliative care consult service of Boston Children’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in 1997. She began her career at the bedside of pediatric oncology patients and later learned from children with diverse illnesses and their families. She retired in 2017 however began doing medical provider outreach for Courageous Parents Network in spring of 2019 to return to her passion of supporting families and those who care for them.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

  • 1.0   AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. *
  • 1.0   Contact Hour CEU for Social Workers. *

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Can Compassion Fatigue?

With the high burnout rate in the field of pediatric palliative care, this session will investigate what the literature reveals about burnout and how each of us can build the personal and professional resilience we need to sustain ourselves in such an emotionally and physically demanding field. Using emerging research from nurses who volunteer at a camp for children with cancer, this session will guide us to discover ways to alleviate moral distress. We will examine whether it’s our compassion that fatigues when we are on the brink of burnout, leaving us to ponder the question, “If everyone is burning out, who will care for the children?

OBJECTIVES:

Identify key factors that lead to burnout
Determine their own personal risk for burnout
Delineate compassion fatigue and moral distress in relation to moral resilience and professional satisfaction
Evaluate resilience-building interventions to mitigate burnout at the personal and institutional levels

CME/CEU available for this webinar

Presenters:

Kelly Johnson  PhD, RN, NEA-BC
VP for Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer
Stanford Children’s Health and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital

Kelly Johnson is the Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford. She has more than 22 years of chief nursing officer experience. She most recently served as the Dori Biester Chair in Pediatric Nursing and senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Children’s Hospital of Colorado. Johnson began her career in health care as an RN, advanced practice nurse, and manager. She holds a BSN from the University of Northern Colorado, MSN from the University of California San Francisco with specialization in Neuroscience and Family Health (FNP), and a PhD from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, College of Nursing in Health Outcomes. From 1993-2008, Johnson served as Vice President for Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer at Craig Hospital, which is a world-renowned, premier center for specialty rehabilitation and research for people with spinal cord and traumatic brain injury.

Lori Butterworth, M.Ed.
Founder & Executive Director
Jacob’s Heart Children’s Cancer Support Services
Co-founder Children’s Hospice & Palliative Care Coalition

Lori Butterworth is an advocate for children, dedicated to ensuring that every child with a life-threatening illness receives compassionate, family-centered care that allows them to live well and die with dignity. In 1998, she founded Jacob’s Heart Children’s Cancer Support Services to provide emotional, practical, financial and bereavement support to families of children with cancer with particular focus on addressing the needs of low-income families living in the rural, agricultural areas of Central California. In 2002, she co-founded the Children’s Hospice & Palliative Care Coalition, a state-wide coalition to open access to hospice and palliative care for children in California, spearheading healthcare policy initiatives including the enactment of the Nick Snow Children’s Hospice and Palliative Care Act and the Concurrent Care for Children provision the Affordable Care Act. Lori earned a master’s degree in education and is currently pursuing a second master’s degree in Psychology from Harvard University conducting research on workplace burnout and post-traumatic growth.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Spirituality in Children & Families Facing Serious Illness

Spiritual Care is one of 8 domains of quality palliative care as defined by the National Consensus Project Clinical Practice Guidelines.  This session will describe the spiritual needs of children and their families as they face serious illness and the end of life.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe research related to spiritual needs of children and their families facing serious illness and death.

2. Identify opportunities for improving the assessment of spiritual needs.

3. Recognize spiritual care as essential for all clinicians involved in pediatric palliative care.

CME/CEU available for this webinar.

Presenters:

Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, MA, FAAN, FPCN, CHPN has been in nursing for 42 years and has focused her clinical expertise and research in pain management, quality of life, and palliative care.  Dr. Ferrell is the Director of Nursing Research & Education and a Professor at the City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, California. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing and she has over 450 publications in peer-reviewed journals and texts.  She is Principal Investigator of a Research Project funded by the National Cancer Institute on “Palliative Care for Patients with Solid Tumors on Phase 1 Clinical Trials” and Principal Investigator of the “End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium (ELNEC)” project.   She directs several other funded projects related to palliative care in cancer centers and QOL issues. Dr. Ferrell was Co-Chairperson of the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care.   Dr. Ferrell completed a Masters degree in Theology, Ethics and Culture from Claremont Graduate University in 2007.  She has authored eleven books including the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing (5th Edition, 2019) published by Oxford University Press.  She is co-author of the text, The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Nursing published in 2008 by Oxford University Press and Making Health Care Whole: Integrating Spirituality into Patient Care (Templeton Press, 2010).  In 2013 Dr. Ferrell was named one of the 30 Visionaries in the field by the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.  In 2019 she was elected a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Gay Walker, RN, CHPNN is the former Program Director for Trinity Kids Care Pediatric Hospice in Los Angeles, California and currently a consultant and speaker for pediatric palliative and end-of-life issues. With over 30 years of nursing experience, Ms. Walker has performed successfully in a wide variety of medical environments and management positions, including supervising clinical services at Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago.

For the past 20 years, she has been actively involved in leading-edge hospice and palliative care services for children and their families. Ms. Walker continues to develop productive and effective hospice programs, services and curriculum in conjunction with the industry’s leading innovators. She has published the Oxford Textbook of Palliative Care Nursing, the recent Springer publication of Handbook of Long Term Care of the Childhood Cancer Survivor, the International Journal of Palliative Nursing, and the Journal of Palliative Medicine; including an abstract for the general assembly of AAHPM/HPNA in the developing field of spirituality and children. She has been an ELNEC faculty since 2006 and enjoyed the privilege of teaching throughout the world regarding the needs of seriously ill children and their families.  She recently received Compassionate Bereavement Certification.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Join us for an interactive Town Hall style meeting to discuss issues surrounding COVID-19 and pediatric palliative care.

To view a recording of this webinar:  Pediatric Palliative Care COVID-19 Town Hall virtual meeting     Password:  7t@ZWJZ.

This webinar and recording are available free of charge thanks to a grant from the Funeral Service Foundation.

Funeral Service Foundation

Moderator:

Dr. Sarah Friebert, MD
Director, Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Division, Akron Children’s Hospital 
Professor of Pediatrics, Northeast Ohio University College of Medicine

Panelists:

Travis Overbeck, M.Div.
Hospice Chaplain
National Director of Patient Experience
Seasons Healthcare Management

Kerri Padgett
Community Manager, Courageous Parents Network
Pediatric Massage Therapist

Bereaved Mother of Medically Complex Child

Allie Shukraft, MSW, MAT, APHSW-C
Social Worker, Pediatric Advanced Care Team
Atrium Health’s Levine Children’s Hospital
SWHPN, Board Chair

Mary Tiso, RN, MS, CNL, CHPPN
Clinical Manager, Gilchrist Kids
Gilchrist Hospice

Moderator Bio:

Sarah Friebert, MD, is the founder and director of the Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Center and the Expressive Therapy Center at Akron Children’s Hospital. The Center hosts an accredited palliative care fellowship program and held Advanced Certification in Palliative Care from The Joint Commission. In 2012, the Haslinger Center received the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association, a national award honoring innovative programs in palliative and end-of-life care. Dr. Friebert received her medical training at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine. She completed her residency in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and her fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital. She is Professor of Pediatrics at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and past president of Akron Children’s Hospital’s medical staff. In 2009, she was awarded the Children’s Miracle Network Achievement Award for her transformational work. In 2011, she became the first chair holder of the Sarah Elizabeth Friebert Pediatric Palliative Care Endowed Chair. From 2012-2015, Dr. Friebert was a co-Principal Investigator for a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Health Care Innovation Award examining care coordination for children with complex medical conditions. She is consulting Pediatric Medical Director for Hospice of the Western Reserve and for the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, and Program Director in the Center for Healthcare Services Delivery Research and Innovation at the Rebecca D. Considine Research Institute at Akron Children’s

We invite you to join us for a town hall style meeting to discuss the provider experience during COVID-19, specifically focused on interdisciplinary teams who provide pediatric palliative care. This forum, entitled “Trudging through COVID-19: Coping with Provider Grief and Moral Distress” will be an opportunity to address the vastness of the COVID-19 crisis, the grief, loss and stress providers are experiecing, and serve as a network for social support during this unprecedented time. 

To view a recording of this webinar:  Trudging through COVID-19:  Coping with Provider Grief and Moral Distress     Password: 7S#A4k&2

This webinar and recording are available free of charge thank to a grant from the Funeral Service Foundation.

Funeral Service Foundation

Moderator:

Sarah Friebert, MD
Director, Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Division,
Akron Children’s Hospital 

Professor of Pediatrics,
Northeast Ohio University College of Medicine

Panelists:

Stacy Smith, MA, MLS, BSN, RN,  CHPPN, HEC-C 
Senior Director, Ethics, RISE, and Service Excellence
Co-chair Ethics Committee,
Children’s Health, Dallas, TX

Mary Tiso, RN, MS, CNL, CHPPN
Clinical Manager, Gilchrist Kids
Gilchrist Hospice

Lori Butterworth, M.Ed.
Founder and Executive Director,
Jacob’s Heart Children’s Cancer Support Services

Co-Founder Children’s Hospice and Palliative Care Coalition

Moderator Bio:

Sarah Friebert, MD, is the founder and director of the Haslinger Family Pediatric Palliative Care Center and the Expressive Therapy Center at Akron Children’s Hospital. The Center hosts an accredited palliative care fellowship program and held Advanced Certification in Palliative Care from The Joint Commission. In 2012, the Haslinger Center received the Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association, a national award honoring innovative programs in palliative and end-of-life care. Dr. Friebert received her medical training at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine. She completed her residency in pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and her fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology at Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital. She is Professor of Pediatrics at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and past president of Akron Children’s Hospital’s medical staff. In 2009, she was awarded the Children’s Miracle Network Achievement Award for her transformational work. In 2011, she became the first chair holder of the Sarah Elizabeth Friebert Pediatric Palliative Care Endowed Chair. From 2012-2015, Dr. Friebert was a co-Principal Investigator for a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Health Care Innovation Award examining care coordination for children with complex medical conditions. She is consulting Pediatric Medical Director for Hospice of the Western Reserve and for the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, and Program Director in the Center for Healthcare Services Delivery Research and Innovation at the Rebecca D. Considine Research Institute at Akron Children’s

Guiding Families to Mindfulness Supports Decision Making for Adults & Children

Western medicine uses a biomedical approach viewing the patient as a problem to be solved or something to be repaired. The psychosocial model of medicine views the patient in the context of relationships with others. As western trained clinicians, we find it challenging to work with the entire patient (body, psyche, soul/spirit), which requires a shift into the transpersonal realm. This webinar will highlight aspects of the transpersonal realm and demonstrate how working in that realm facilitates patients and their families finding new truths and personal growth.
The participants will learn about ways to guide families to a mindful state using both conventional MBSR approaches and indigenous approaches that rely upon a sonic drive such as drumming. The participants will see how these approaches have been applied in the hospital setting in work with critically ill and dying children. Additionally, the participants will have an opportunity to experience the approach to mindfulness that the presenters are championing in their clinic work.
The participants need to understand how to connect with our patients on the level body, psyche, and spirit. This webinar addresses ways to achieve that.

Learning Objectives:

1. The participant will be able to define mindfulness and list at least three approaches to aid in achieving a mindful state.
2. The participants will be able to define the trans-personal state and explain how it relates to mindfulness.
3. The participant will experience a short mindful journey in trans-personal space.

Presenters:

David M Steinhorn, MD Medical Director, Pediatric Palliative Care Children’s National Hospital
Jana Din Shamanic Healing Practitioner/Director Tao Center for Healing

CEU available for this webinar*

*1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Please note that CME credit is not available for this webinar.

Ethical Questions in Pediatric Palliative Care

Many clinicians are uncertain when to consult ethics versus palliative care. Palliative care clinicians help in many situations involving an ethical conflict or dilemma.
This presentation will discuss the ways in which clinical ethics and palliative care overlap in the care of seriously ill children and their families — as well as the important ways in which they differ. The speaker will touch on common ethical dilemmas that arise in pediatric palliative care practice, using case examples to illustrate the application of relevant ethical frameworks. Specific topics will include parental requests for non-disclosure, “elective” requests for withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies, and disagreement between parents and medical teams about suffering and how best to address it.

Learning Objectives:

1. List differences and synergies between clinical ethics and palliative care for children with serious illness and their families.
2. Apply ethical frameworks including principalism, ethics of care, and narrative ethics to common challenges in palliative care.
3. Understand when a clinical ethics consult be helpful for palliative care teams, patients, and families.

Presenter:

Sabrina F. Derrington, MD, MA, HEC-C Associate Professor of Pediatrics — Critical Care and Palliative Care Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Associate Director for Clinical Ethics and Education, Lurie Children’s Ethics Program Chair of the Ethics Advisory Board, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

Dr. Derrington obtained her medical degree from the University of California at Davis, and holds a master’s degree in Bioethics and Health Policy from Loyola University. She completed her residency and fellowship at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and has practiced pediatric critical care and palliative care for 9 years. In addition to her clinical roles, she chairs the ethics committee at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago and oversees clinical ethics consultation and ethics education for the hospital. Her research interests include improving health equity, understanding the impact of social determinants of health on post-ICU outcomes, integrated communication curricula for pediatric trainees, and addressing staff burnout through narrative medicine practices.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

PPC Virtual Town Hall:  Grief and Memorialization during COVID-19

Link to recording:  Grief and Memorialization during COVID-19            Password:  3l#+vR75

The Pediatric Palliative Care Webinar Series and the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Care Network (SWHPN) offers a joint presentation, generously supported by the Funeral Service Foundation. 

Join us for a discussion on how clinical practice in pediatric palliative care has changed in light of COVID-19-related policies and how that has impacted the way we respond to family grief, provide bereavement support, and offer memorialization opportunities. 

Additionally, there is enormous collective and personal grief associated with the immense racial inequities that have recently become part of the public consciousness. This grief is very personal for those who have been directly affected by systemic racial inequities, and for whom the knowledge of these inequalities has been a lived experience for hundreds of years. The effect of this additional grief compounded with the uncertainty caused by an ongoing global pandemic has created an unprecedented need for new dialogues and evaluation of support systems provided by communities of care. 

This panel of pediatric palliative care social workers and researchers will discuss research, clinical observations, and methods for supporting families and our teams during this challenging time. 

The interactive discussion will take place on Tuesday, June 30 from 1-2pm PST/2-3pm MST/3-4pm CST/4-5pm EST. This town hall is free of charge and is being offered in addition to our regularly scheduled June webinar.

This webinar is available free of charge thanks to a grant from the Funeral Service Foundation.

Funeral Service Foundation

Expert Panel:

Susan Cadell
Susan Cadell, PhD, RSW is a social work researcher and Professor in the School of Social Work at Renison University College at the University of Waterloo, in Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Susan’s research concerns death, dying and bereavement, particularly positive outcomes of caregiving and grief. Susan’s most recent projects concern the public health model of bereavement support, grief after Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD), and tattoos that disrupt, celebrate or memorialize.

Rachel Rusch

Rachel Rusch (MSW, MA) is a Clinical Social Worker with the Division of Comfort and Palliative Care at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. She is a graduate of Harvard Medical School’s Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Fellowship with a concentration in pediatrics. She holds both a Master of Social Work degree from New York University, where she received the Silver Citizenship Award, as well as a Master of Arts in Child Development from Sarah Lawrence College. Graduate of the Zelda Foster Palliative and End-of-Life Care MSW Fellowship, she is a proud member of the Social Work Hospice and Palliative Care Network and was the recipient of the 2020 Emerging Leader in Professional Practice Award. Rachel is actively pursuing research interests surrounding patient, family, and provider perseverance.

Solimar Santiago-Warner

Solimar Santiago-Warner, MSW, LCSW, is a perinatal palliative care social worker at Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital at New York Presbyterian, where she supports mothers, families and their medical teams as they navigate life-limiting diagnosis and loss.  In addition to her work with patients, Solimar provides consultation and support to the Labor & Delivery personnel and works with the OB/GYN service to develop a patient centered curriculum focusing on perinatal loss for medical residents.
Solimar is a regular speaker on perinatal loss, psychosocial support in the medical setting and care with cultural competency.  She drafts administrative policies around perinatal loss and bereavement and provides clinical supervision to licensed social workers and MSW students.
Solimar is a candidate for a Doctorate in Social Work (DSW) at the NYU Silver School of Social Work where her research focuses on supporting diverse/Latinx families through perinatal loss.  She graduated from Boston College School of Social Work and completed the Zelda Foster Studies Program in Palliative and End-of-Life Care at NYU. Solimar received additional training in maternal mental health and perinatal bereavement through the Seleni Institute and the Resolve Through Sharing (RTS) Bereavement program.

Beyond Fairy Tale Endings: A Role for Children’s Storybooks as Legacy Tools

Palliative providers often face the daunting task of finding suitable words to explain a life-threatening illness or death to a loved child or grandchild. Children’s storybooks have the potential to facilitate communication for children living with a serious illness and for children coping with the impending or recent death of a loved one. This session will provide examples of how books can be used to help children to address physical changes; communicate their fears, worries, hopes; and safe ways to say good-bye (legacy work) while reassuring they will be remembered.

Learning Objectives:

1. Introduce the use of children’s storybooks as tools to foster preparatory communication and bereavement care for children and for the young-at-heart
2. Summarize the ways that children’s storybooks depict end of life with revealed trends in ethnic and religious content representation
3. Address challenges and other tools to enhance communication about progressive illness, dying and death

Presenters:

Lori Wiener, PhD, DCSW – Co-Director Behavioral Health Core, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health
Meaghann Weaver, MD, MPH – Chief, Division of Pediatric Palliative Care, Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, NE

Dr. Lori Wiener is co-director of the Behavioral Science Core and Head of the Psychosocial Support and Research Program at the pediatric oncology branch of the National Cancer Institute. As both a clinician and behavioral scientist, Dr. Wiener has dedicated her career to the fields of oncology and pediatric HIV/AIDS. At NCI Pediatric Oncology Branch, she developed a robust clinical and research program that has focused on critical clinical issues such as parental coping, lone parenting, transnational parenting, emotional consequences of medically required isolation, sibling and sibling donor experiences, graph versus host disease, and end-of-life planning. Dr. Wiener has also dedicated a substantial part of her career to applying knowledge from her clinical experience and psychosocial studies to create innovative resources such as books, workbooks, therapeutic games and an advance care planning guide for children, adolescents and young adults. Each of these resources are distributed worldwide and widely utilized in pediatric centers. Dr. Wiener has published extensively with over 200 peer review papers and books chapters, co-edited the Pediatric Psycho-Oncology: A Quick Reference on the Psychosocial Dimensions of Cancer Symptom Management, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2015 and Pediatric Psychosocial Oncology: Textbook for Multi-disciplinary Care, Springer International Publishing, 2016. She has been part of the leadership team that has developed the first evidence-based psychosocial standards of care for children with cancer and their family members.

Dr. Meaghann Weaver serves as Chief of the Division of Pediatric Palliative Care at the Children’s Hospital and Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Meaghann majored in African Studies and Theology before attending medical school, pediatric residency, pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship, and then palliative care and hospice fellowship. She has an MPH with global epidemiology focus. Meaghann is interested in supportive care and complex symptom management, health equity for patients in low-resource settings, spirituality in healthcare, caregiver resilience, global health, and implementation science. She values team science and palliative care research.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Pediatric Concurrent Care

This webinar will feature a discussion of the benefits and challenges of pediatric concurrent care over the last decade. Learners need new skills managing pediatric concurrent care because of recent changes in state Medicaid rules and practices. In addition, these professionals also need new information on the challenges encountered and benefits gained of implementing concurrent care. This webinar will help to improve understanding of pediatric concurrent care.

Learning Objectives:

1. Review background of concurrent care.
2. Identify challenges and benefits of concurrent care
3. Explore implication of concurrent care.

Presenter:

Lisa C. Lindley Associate Professor & Nightingale Endowed Faculty Fellow

Dr. Lindley is a child health services and policy researchers. Her research focuses on health care systems and policy interventions that promote quality, accessible care for children and their families at end of life. Dr. Lindley has expertise in advanced statistical techniques, data management, and claims-based data. She is the recipient of a NIH pre-doctoral fellowship (T32), AHRQ dissertation award (R36), NIH career development award (K01), and NIH research project grant (R01) in support of her research work.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Pain Education and Management for Youth and Families

There is a significant, problematic lack of pain education across disciplines, including medicine and psychology. The pain education that does exist is typically biomedical, despite the fact research indicates that pain is a biopsychosocial issue requiring a biopsychosocial solution. This presentation will address these issues, providing pain education for multidisciplinary providers as well as offering a biopsychosocial frame for treatment and practice.
This course will cover basic pain neuroscience education, how to “explain pain” to youth and parents, and how to incoroporate user-friendly metaphors when treating pediatric pain. This talk also offers an introduction to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for pediatric chronic pain and illness, outlining how to explain and implement a biopsychosocial approach to treatment, techniques used in CBT, and patient psychoeducation.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn how to teach the biopsychosocial model of pain management to pediatric patients and their caregivers.
2. Learn how to “explain pain” to youth and families using neuroscience and metaphor.
3. Discuss 3 CBT strategies used in pediatric pain management.

Presenter:

Rachel Zoffness PhD

Rachel Zoffness PhD is a pain psychologist and Assistant Clinical Professor at the UCSF School of Medicine, where she teaches pain education for medical residents and interns. She serves on the board of the American Association of Pain Psychology, where she founded the Pediatric Division, and piloted the Psychology Today column “Pain, Explained.” Her first book, The Chronic Pain and Illness Workbook for Teens, is the first of its kind to offer pain education and evidence-based pain management techniques for youth. Her second book, The Pain Management Workbook, comes out in 2020. More information about Dr. Zoffness can be found at zoffness.com. Find her on Twitter @drzoffness.

Accreditation:  CME/CEU are available for this webinar

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Stanford University School of Medicine and Jacob’s Heart Children’s’ Cancer Support Services.

The Stanford University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Stanford University School of Medicine designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM.

Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The California Board of Registered Nursing recognizes that Continuing Medical Education (CME) is acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements as long as the course is certified for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM (rn.ca.gov).  Nurses will receive a Certificate of Participation following this activity that may be used for license renewal.

1.0 CE Contact Hours. CE’s provided through Cal State San Marcos (CSUSM) Extended Learning.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP 11422 and by the Board of Behavioral Sciences, through the CSUSM WASC Accreditation.

Building Partnerships with Funeral Professionals in Supporting Families & Their Communities Following the Death of a Child

When a child dies, it is such a unique and profound event that many funeral professionals are unprepared for the emotional task and receive very little training and/or instruction in regard to caring for a family following the death of a child. Healthcare providers serve as a link between families, funeral professionals and grief specialists; but also often struggle in their comfort and knowledge in talking about funeral service options, cremation and burial.
The death of a child creates a wave of emotional trauma that reverberates through families, schools, faith communities, sports teams, and entire communities. Healthcare providers have a unique opportunity to build partnerships with funeral professionals in the emotional and complex responsibility of guiding a family through many difficult decisions that can shape the final moments and memories of a family and their community following the death of a child. This session will present findings from an innovative project that brought together hospital, hospice, funeral service, grief professionals and parents to examine best practices for the continuum of care following the death of a child.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe how to build partnerships with funeral professionals and grief specialists to facilitate the continuum of care
2. Identify legacy building and memorialization activities unique to children
3. Describe a communication plan and transition of care protocol that promotes healing for families and staff

Presenters:

Kristin James, Executive Director, Greater Illinois Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition

Betsy Hawley, Executive Director, Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition – Pennsylvania

Kelly Manion – Funeral Service Foundation

Kristin James, LCPC, currently coordinates the Greater Illinois Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition and has specialized in working with families coping with illness, trauma and death for over twenty years. Kristin has provided clinical consultation and extensive training, advocacy and education to medical teams, community agencies, and school systems throughout the Chicagoland area. She is an experienced clinician and has provided individual, family, and group counseling. Kristin developed a benchmarked program for Pediatric Bereavement Care at Lurie Children’s Hospital/Children’s Memorial Hospital and is nationally recognized as an expert in grieving children and bereaved parents. She has also participated in and published numerous research studies. Ms. James received her Masters in counseling from Loyola University.

Betsy Hawley, MA, is the Executive Director of the Pediatric Palliative Care Coalition, a Pennsylvania statewide coalition. She has 25 years of experience in nonprofit management in both healthcare and community development. Betsy speaks extensively across Pennsylvania and nationally on coalition building and pediatric palliative care. She is a member of the Pediatric Leadership Team of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Coalition and serves a member of the Patient Quality of Life Coalition.

Register Now for 2020 PPC Webinar Series

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the cost?

$40 Individual Registration
Discounted rates are available for groups of 5 or more and for registering for the entire series, please contact: anna@jacobsheart.org

Is accreditation available for the webinar series?

Each webinar is awarded accreditation on an individual basis.  Each webinar description will indicate whether CME, CEU or both are available.

Shiley-CSU-Institute-for-Palliative-Care

What kind of system or computer do I need to log on to the webinar?

Once you register for the webinar, you will be sent a link to a Zoom meeting. It is recommended to download Zoom before the first webinar. If you have never used Zoom before, it’s easy.

View a video that shows you how to join a Zoom meeting. If your computer audio doesn’t work, you will also be given a phone number to call in.

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